Wednesday, September 1, 2010

So, this Girl would like to see Bloem, PMB and Polokwane Fashion Week...

We see it all the time in South Africa and I think sometimes I forget how much a lot of people out there fail to reason properly. An example of this is the argument that the South African press is not patriotic, simply because the ANC is mostly found wanting. Does support for the ruling party constitute patriotism? Well, this is a far stretch from fashion and here I find myself being accused by one ifashion reader who, after I posted a blog on the website bemoaning the creation of countless fashion weeks, called me unpatriotic and opposed to the upliftment of designers around the country. She seems to believe that the segmentation of the industry that has resulted from the creation of various fashion weeks is good. I argued that it isn't and until such time that one, any one, can prove that the unity of the design industry is not a desirable model for its own growth I can't see how I can support initiatives that perpetrate mediocrity.
Read the thread below:
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written by Tashie, August 30, 2010


Wow, this is quite a sad philosophy about fashion in South Africa...


Tell me do you have any evidence to support your theory, i think not! Ive done my research yes... And the more exposure the better, its called creating job oppertunities, expression of the arts...


You clearly have no faith or pride when it comes to South Africa!


Be it PTA or even Bloem! it will pave the way for creativity to boom in this country! it will inspire young designers, and for once the arts will get the recognition it deserves...
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written by Sandiso, August 30, 2010


Hi Tashie.


Thanks for the comment.I'm glad you've done your research and concluded that segmentation, as it were, is a good thing. I'll have you know that it works for no industry. Have you ever heard of initiatives like BUSA (Business Unity South Africa)? Such initiatives are ways of uniting to advocate for a better business climate in the country. As the saying goes "there's power in numbers". If we all decide to do our own thing instead of strengthening the intiatives that are already in place e.g: SA Fashion Week, are we not reversing the gains? I hope you do engage with other credible people in fashion,it might broaden the scope for you to better understand what the point here is. Faith in SA FASHION, for me, also involves resisting actions that seek to compromise the standard that so many people have worked for so many years to make a norm. I have personally witness the standards at places like Mpumalanga Fashion Week and I have to say I don't see how you could be so "proud" of such things.

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written by Tashie, September 01, 2010


Well in that case it is up to people like you who know so much about fashion to set a standard, to involve those who need to be educated about fashion weeks... dont you think?


I stand by my point. Do you seriously want fashion weeks to be so scares in a country with so much to offer?


Do you want to be one of those pessimistic people because according to you there has to be a so called standard?


If you are so concerned about standards being dropped, why dont you do something about it? Or dont you believe in giving back to the community?


Offcaorse there is going to be some bumps along the way... but are you selfish enough to not want other provinces to prosper even if they start from scratch?


Luckily or must i say hopefully your not one to be making these dicisions...
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written by Sandiso, September 01, 2010


I rest my case and hope someday you'll learn the meaning of blind and uniformed patriotism.
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The one thing that I find correct in Tashie's argument is the fact that commentators, including myself, should be at the forefront- along with other stakeholders like designers and such- of setting the standard. I'd like to believe that my rejection of mediocrity is one such step. I'd also like to assert that the standard was set long ago- when it comes to fashion week- by one Lucilla Booyzen.
(Tashie's comments along with mine are taken from ifashion.co.za)

2 comments:

Buhle '08 said...

That will be the death of SA Fashion if we see all these little fashion weeks. Its unnecessary, really because these lil dressmaaker conventions do not add anything to the industry!
I still have an issue with the AFI fashion weeks- aint there a bit too many already? Audi, Africa JHB, Africa CTFW, who ARE all these designers who are showing and what DO they have to show for their collections besides being the toast of tht town and being asked by celebs to dress them at the SAMA's... we need to pool these resources and create proper fashion weeks that will ensure that designers have an audience and that the standard must be so high, you'll feel like you should've paid more for your ticket and also designers will get the respect due to them and only then will our industry get better!!!

Sandiso Ngubane said...

My point exactly. Clearly Tashie finds this argument too complex to comprehend. I don't blame her, though. Maybe for many people when we speak about fashion they equate this to dressmaking and the like. SA Fashion Week has what they call the Regional Collections, I agree that these might not be known to a lot of people and the media is to blame for this too, but there is no need for people to be convening their own thing. It's like a spaza shop business now. Wow.